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J/A+A/610/A7   Photometry and models of long-period asteroids (Marciniak+, 2018)

Photometric survey, modelling, and scaling of long-period and low-amplitude asteroids. Marciniak A., Bartczak P., Mueller T., Sanabria J.J., Ali-Lagoa V., Antonini P., Behrend R., Bernasconi L., Bronikowska M., Butkiewicz-Bkak M., Cikota A., Crippa R., Ditteon R., Dudzinski G., Duffard R., Dziadura K., Fauvaud S., Geier S., Hirsch R., Horbowicz J., Hren M., Jerosimic L., Kaminski K., Kankiewicz P., Konstanciak I., Korlevic P., Kosturkiewicz E., Kudak V., Manzini F., Morales N., Murawiecka M., Ogloza W., Oszkiewicz D., Pilcher F., Polakis T., Poncy R., Santana-Ros T., Siwak M., Skiff B., Sobkowiak K., Stoss R., Zejmo M., Zukowski K. <Astron. Astrophys. 610, A7 (2018)> =2018A&A...610A...7M (SIMBAD/NED BibCode)
ADC_Keywords: Solar system ; Minor planets ; Photometry Keywords: techniques: photometric - minor planets: asteroids Abstract: The available set of spin and shape modelled asteroids is strongly biased against slowly rotating targets and those with low lightcurve amplitudes. This is due to the observing selection effects. As a consequence, the current picture of asteroid spin axis distribution, rotation rates, radiometric properties, or aspects related to the object's internal structure might be affected too. To counteract these selection effects, we are running a photometric campaign of a large sample of main belt asteroids omitted in most previous studies. Using least chi-squared fitting we determined synodic rotation periods and verified previous determinations. When a dataset for a given target was sufficiently large and varied, we performed spin and shape modelling with two different methods to compare their performance. We used the convex inversion method and the non-convex SAGE algorithm, applied on the same datasets of dense lightcurves. Both methods search for the lowest deviations between observed and modelled lightcurves, though using different approaches. Unlike convex inversion, the SAGE method allows for the existence of valleys and indentations on the shapes based only on lightcurves. We obtain detailed spin and shape models for the first five targets of our sample: (159) Aemilia, (227) Philosophia, (329) Svea, (478) Tergeste, and (487) Venetia. When compared to stellar occultation chords, our models obtained an absolute size scale and major topographic features of the shape models were also confirmed. When applied to thermophysical modelling (TPM), they provided a very good fit to the infrared data and allowed their size, albedo, and thermal inertia to be determined. Convex and non-convex shape models provide comparable fits to lightcurves. However, some non-convex models fit notably better to stellar occultation chords and to infrared data in sophisticated thermophysical modelling (TPM). In some cases TPM showed strong preference for one of the spin and shape solutions. Also, we confirmed that slowly rotating asteroids tend to have higher-than-average values of thermal inertia, which might be caused by properties of the surface layers underlying the skin depth. Description: The files contain asteroid brightness and geometry for corresponding epochs. The "*lcs" files were used for obtaining shape models and spin states of the asteroids using multi-apparition data. Individual lightcurves within a file are separated by an empty line, all lightcurves are relative. The "*data" files contain the data used for finding the period and contain lightcurves from only one apparition. Here data are relative as well, except for 932 Hooveria and 830 Petropolitana, where all data were calibrated data using CMC15, APASS and GAIA catalogue stars. File Summary:
FileName Lrecl Records Explanations
ReadMe 80 . This file table2.dat 71 11 Synodic periods and amplitude values found within this project compared to literature data gathered previously in LCDB 159lcs.dat 112 1455 Asteroid 159 Aemilia individual lightcurves 227lcs.dat 112 2243 Asteroid 227 Philosophia individual lightcurves 329lcs.dat 112 1839 Asteroid 329 Svea individual lightcurves 478lcs.dat 112 1364 Asteroid 478 Tergeste individual lightcurves 487lcs.dat 112 1329 Asteroid 487 Venetia individual lightcurves 551data.dat 22 533 Asteroid 551 Ortrud individual lightcurves 581data.dat 22 224 Asteroid 581 Tauntonia individual lightcurves 830data.dat 22 814 Asteroid 830 Petropolitana individual lightcurves 923data.dat 22 216 Asteroid 923 Herluga individual lightcurves 932data.dat 22 584 Asteroid 932 Hooveria individual lightcurves 995data.dat 22 802 Asteroid 995 Sternberga individual lightcurves
See also: B/astorb : Orbits of Minor Planets (Bowell+ 2014) J/A+A/465/331 : Asteroid brightness and geometry (Durech+, 2007) J/A+A/498/313 : Photometry of 3 main belt asteroids (Marciniak+, 2009) J/A+A/508/1503 : Photometry of 3 main belt asteroids (Marciniak+, 2009) J/A+A/529/A107 : Photometry of 4 main belt asteroids (Marciniak+, 2011) J/A+A/545/A131 : Photometry of 8 main belt asteroids (Marciniak+, 2012) J/A+A/546/A72 : Light curves of Flora region asteroids (Kryszczynska+, 2012) J/A+A/598/A63 : 2015 TB145 light curve (Mueller+, 2017) Byte-by-byte Description of file: table2.dat
Bytes Format Units Label Explanations
1- 19 A19 --- Name Asteroid name 22- 30 A9 --- Amp Amplitude (LCDB and this work) 32- 37 F6.3 h PerLCBD LCBD period 40- 41 A2 --- q_PerLCBD Period quality code 43- 49 F7.3 h Per Period (this work) 51- 55 F5.3 h e_Per rms uncertainty on Per 57 A1 --- n_Per [*] * for period determinations substantially differing from previously accepted values 59 A1 --- Note [nm] n for Targets with new periods, m for Targets with models 61- 71 A11 --- FileName Name of the tabel with light curve data
Byte-by-byte Description of file: *lcs.dat
Bytes Format Units Label Explanations
2- 15 F14.6 d JD JD epoch corrected for the light-time corresponding to the Earth-asteroid distance 17- 28 E12.6 --- br Relative brightness in intensity units, mean brightness of each lightcurve is unity 30- 42 E13.6 AU Sx x component of the vector from the asteroid to the Sun in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates 44- 56 E13.6 AU Sy y component of the vector from the asteroid to the Sun in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates 58- 70 E13.6 AU Sz z component of the vector from the asteroid to the Sun in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates 72- 84 E13.6 AU Ex x component of the vector from the asteroid to the Earth in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates 86- 98 E13.6 AU Ey y component of the vector from the asteroid to the Earth in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates 100-112 E13.6 AU Ez z component of the vector from the asteroid to the Earth in J2000 ecliptic Cartesian coordinates
Byte-by-byte Description of file: *data.dat
Bytes Format Units Label Explanations
2- 15 F14.6 d JD JD epoch corrected for the light-time corresponding to the Earth-asteroid distance 17- 22 F6.3 mag br Brightness in magnitude units
Acknowledgements: Anna Marciniak, am(at)amu.edu.pl
(End) Patricia Vannier [CDS] 20-Oct-2017
The document above follows the rules of the Standard Description for Astronomical Catalogues.From this documentation it is possible to generate f77 program to load files into arrays or line by line

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